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    Recently (OK, today), I was watching a random Guthrie Govan lesson video on YouTube (I get a sick satisfaction out of watching guitarists who are much better than I'll ever be).

    In the clip, which you can watch here, Govan discusses elements of his right-hand (or right-thumb) slap technique.

    "Some people can do the clever Victor Wooten thing where you can slap up and down," he says. "For me, that only works on the E string.

    "My thumb is bigger than the gap between two strings. I can't get it in there, so I don't really do that. If you want to find out more about that, check out a guy called Scotty Mishoe, who's unbelievably good."

    Scotty Mishoe, aka Scott Mishoe. That's a name I hadn't heard before; but since the recommendation came from Govan, I was more than willing to check it out, and I'm glad I did.

    Even though the video below was posted in 2012, it's totally new to me; and, just as Govan promised, there's some incredible right-hand slapping action going on. And he's no slouch with his left hand, either. In terms of an artist page, bio and beyond, there's not a lot to be found online, although there are several Mishoe videos available on YouTube. This one happens to be my favorite.

    As always, enjoy!


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    One day in late 1995, I was driving to a town at the very top of New York state, just south of the Quebec border.

    Suddenly, as I was passing through what seemed like the middle of nowhere (I might've been in the heart of New York's awesome Adirondack Mountains) a strange song came on the radio.

    Because the radio reception in the mountains was terrible and full of static, I couldn't hear the song clearly. But it sounded like a "new" Stevie Ray Vaughan song; the guitar playing and the vocals sounded very much like that of the late SRV, who had been dead for five boring years.

    I could make out a few of the lyrics, which included stuff like "that Texas sound,""soul to soul" and "I've been gone too long." It was as if SRV was saying howdy from the grave!

    I remained confused by the mystery "SRV" song — until a few months later, when I found out (through my brother, who also had heard the song and decided to track it down, pre-Google) that it was written and recorded by a guitarist named Corey Stevens, a huge Vaughan fan.

    Feel free to check out the song, "Gone Too Long," below. Hopefully you can see why I was so bewildered that day. Remember, the reception in my car was terrible!

    Stevens, a fine guitarist in his own right (with a huge discography, according to Wiki), is able to take on the personas of a host of blues and rock greats, most notably SRV. He also does a fine Eric Clapton.

    "Gone Too Long" is available on Stevens' 1995 album Blue Drops of Rain (Eureka Records), which is pictured above. The album also features a cover of SRV's "Lenny" (See the bottom video below).

    To see what Stevens is up to these days (and to catch one of his shows), visit coreystevens.com.

    If you're interested in this Stevie Ray Vaughan fellow, check out the all-new October 2014 issue of Guitar World, which is available now at the Guitar World Online Store. We count down Vaughan's 30 greatest guitar performances, check in with his Number One Strat, celebrate 60 years of the Strat and more.

    Additional Content

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    A couple of weeks ago, I gave you a short, 30-minute guitar workout designed for guitarists whose practice time is limited.

    The positive response I received prompted me to create an additional lesson, which, in combination with my original workout, will give you a good hour of intensive practice.

    For this lesson, I have selected a classical piece for you to learn: Paganini's 16th Caprice in G minor. Learning classical pieces is a great way to improve your technique and theory. It's also more beneficial to practice something musical, rather than just working on exercises. Use my 30-minute workout as a warmup and then spend an additional 30 minutes to an hour working on this piece.

    It's very challenging and features a good selection of arpeggios, wide intervals, chromatic runs, string skipping and sequences. It's very rewarding to learn and play in its entirety. Because of its length, I have the divided the piece into three parts.

    Your first task will be to memorize the notes, which in itself is a big challenge. I would suggest taking it one bar at a time, memorizing the notes and working out the fingering. Then attempt to perform the bar in full. Start at the beginning with bar 1, and add a new bar every day. Once the notes are memorized, you can begin to work with a metronome and build speed.

    Start at 80 bpm playing 8th notes and increase the metronome by 10 bpm after each successful performance. When you reach 120 bpm, go back to 60 bpm and play the piece as 16th notes. From there, take it as fast you can.

    It's meant to be at a tempo of 165 bpm, which is incredibly fast for a piece so complex. I can only get to around 120 bpm before it becomes too challenging. For this lesson, I have recorded myself performing the piece in full at the comfortable tempo of 100 bpm. Use this as a reference for yourself when learning. I have also marked in the Soundcloud link where each of the three parts begins to help you navigate.

    caprice1.jpg

    The first part begins with several arpeggios which you will need to play using sweep picking (bars 1 to 6). Everything else should be played with alternate picking. There's a tricky string skipping section at bar 7, which you can either play with your second finger or entirely with the pick. After bar 8, it repeats from the beginning. From bars 9 to 14, you have more arpeggios and string-skipping, but this time you will not need to sweep the arpeggios. Bar 14 ends with a long A# major arpeggio over three octaves.

    Next week, we will look into detail at the second part of the piece and also analyze some of the theory used in its composition. Best of luck, cheers!

    Will Wallner is a guitarist from England now living in Los Angeles. He recently signed a solo deal with Polish record label Metal Mind Productions for the release of his debut album, which features influential musicians from hard rock and heavy metal. He also is the lead guitarist for White Wizzard (Earache Records) and in 2012 toured Japan, America and Canada. Follow Will on Facebook and Twitter.


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    Conor Oberst has unveiled the third video from his critically acclaimed new album Upside Down Mountain.

    We're excited to share “Common Knowledge," a companion piece to the album's first video, "Zigzagging Toward The Light."

    The video's release comes just a few days before the acclaimed singer/songwriter embarks on the second leg of a coast to coast tour, beginning September 14th in Salt Lake City.

    Conor has also announced plans to release two previously unheard songs, “Standing On The Outside” and “Sugar Street” - recorded during the Upside Down Mountain sessions - for this year's Black Friday Record Store Day on November 28th.

    Upside Down Mountain, his debut album for Nonesuch Records, was released in May and has been hailed by critics as a creative triumph for the Bright Eyes frontman.

    The fall tour, featuring special guest Jonathan Wilson, will make stops in Salt Lake City, Austin, Dallas, Seattle, Portland and more. Los Angeles fans can see him play a very special co-headline show with folk legend John Prine at the Greek Theater on October 5th. All dates below.

    Tour Dates
    Sept 14 Salt Lake City, UT @ Red Butte Garden Amphitheatre #
    Sept 16 Boulder, CO @ Boulder Theater #
    Sept 18 Tulsa, OK @ Cain’s Ballroom #
    Sept 19 Houston, TX @ House of Blues #
    Sept 20 Austin, TX @ Stubb’s Waller Creek Amphitheater #
    Sept 21 Dallas, TX @ AT&T Performing Arts Center – Annette Strauss Artist Square #
    Sept 23 Albuquerque, NM @ Sunshine Theatre #
    Sept 24 Aspen, CO @ Belly Up #
    Sept 25 Bellvue, CO @ Mishawaka Amphitheatre #
    Sept 27 Boise, ID @ Knitting Factory #
    Sept 28 Spokane, WA @ Knitting Factory #
    Sept 30 Seattle, WA @ Showbox at the Market #
    Oct 1 Portland, OR @ Crystal Ballroom #
    Oct 3 San Francisco, CA @ Hardly Strictly Bluegrass
    Oct 4 San Francisco, CA @ The Fillmore #
    Oct 5 Los Angeles, CA @ Greek Theatre (Co-Headline w/ John Prine)
    Oct 11 Mexico City, MX @ Corona Capital Music Festival

    More at http://www.conoroberst.com/


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    We don't know about you, but around here, September brings to mind tours and massive live shows — probably because it's the only month where summer and fall, the two biggest rock touring seasons, collide.

    So, as our thoughts turn to the gigs we've reported on, witnessed and celebrated this year, we thought we'd get our readers — as in, you guys! — involved as we attempt to pinpoint rock's greatest live band or artist!

    Welcome to Guitar World's official readers poll for September (It's the first readers poll we've conducted since November 2013, all you poll haters out there), the Battle of the Greatest Live Bands. It kicked off Wednesday, September 3.

    Although we (obviously) had thousands of artists and/or bands to choose from, we decided to narrow things down to a mere 32 names, which is perfect for a month's worth of intense — and fun (it's supposed to be fun, people!) matchups. All the artists were carefully selected by Guitar World's entire editorial staff.

    Most importantly, note that this poll involves ONLY still-existing bands, so you won't get to watch the Doors duke it out with Led Zeppelin! Pantera will not go head to head with Cream. The Jimi Hendrix Experience will not compete with ... you get the idea.

    Here are our 32 artists, in alphabetical order:

    AC/DC, Aerosmith, Alice Cooper, the Allman Brothers Band, Black Sabbath, Dillinger Escape Plan, Eagles, Foo Fighters, Guns N’ Roses, Iron Maiden, Jack White, Kiss, Korn, Metallica, Muse, Nine Inch Nails, Paul McCartney, Pearl Jam, Phish, Queen, Radiohead, Rammstein, Red Hot Chili Peppers, the Rolling Stones, Rush, Slayer, Slipknot, Soundgarden, Tool, U2, Van Halen and ZZ Top.


    Here's how the bracket was — very unscientifically — compiled:

    We drew the artists' names out of a hat (It was, in fact, a Quebec Nordiques baseball-style cap) to help us create our bracket, which is available for your viewing pleasure below. Obviously, none of these of bands are ranked or come from a previously compiled list, so we chose purely random matchups to have as little impact as possible on the final outcome. We're actually pretty pleased with the way the bracket turned out!

    Remember that, as with any poll, genre might occasionally clash against genre, so you'll just need to decide which artist has (or has had) the most to offer within his/their genre, perhaps which one has or had more natural talent or technical skill, which one had the biggest influence on other live acts, etc.

    Let's get started! As always, you can vote only once per matchup (once per device, that is), and we'll be posting matchups pretty much every day of the month, sometimes more than once per day, just to give you an early warning!

    This matchup finds Rush going head to head with Korn!

    Head HERE to see every matchup so far.

    Behold the Current Bracket!

    2014.09.05 32 Bracket

    Yesterday's Winner

    Yesterday, AC/DC (67.63 percent) defeated the Rolling Stones (32.37 percent). Thanks for voting!

    Today's Polls: Vote Now!

    Today, Van Halen are going head to head with Nine Inch Nails. You can check out that poll right here. We're also running a bonus poll today — Rush against Korn. For this one, you can cast your vote below! We don't need to tell you about these bands! We'll just let the videos below do the talking! Be sure to vote below. You have one day to vote!

    Additional Content

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    Slipknot have released a new video promoting their upcoming Prepare For Hell Tour (with Korn and King 810), and you can check it out below.

    The clip features Corey Taylor wearing his new mask, obscured by some dirty plastic sheets.

    Take a look — and let us know what you think in the comments or on Facebook!

    Slipknot's new album, 5: The Gray Chapter, will be released October 21.

    Additional Content

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    Jamestown Revival are excited to announce the details of their upcoming North American tour this fall.

    The band are playing coast-to-coast in many major markets, including the Bowery Ballroom in New York City on November 10, the Double Door in Chicago on November 16, and the Great American Music Hall in San Francisco on Nov 28.

    The band will perform songs from their acclaimed debut album UTAH, which was released earlier this year. Support on the upcoming tour dates will be provided by Black Cadillacs, Pete Molinari, Nikki Lane, and Hollow Wood. Check the band's full itinerary below.

    View the official video for California "Cast Iron Soul"

    Jamestown Revival is made up of Jonathan Clay and Zach Chance, two close friends who grew up together in the small Texas town of Magnolia. From a young age, they shared a love for music as well as the outdoors.

    At the age of 22, they moved to Austin and began to craft a sound of their own. Deeply rooted in harmony, they merged the sounds of the South with classic American, and Western rock. Looking for adventure, as well as a change of pace, they eventually made the decision to head west and make the move to Los Angeles, CA. There, the duo wrote the songs that would become theirfull-length debut, UTAH.

    In order to capture the spirit of the music, the two found a log cabin high within the Wasatch Mountains of Utah. The pair, along with their band and engineer, set out to convert it in to a temporary recording studio. With wild moose right outside the window, and aspen leaves spinning in the wind, they tracked the 11 songs that comprise UTAH. Performed live, with no headphones, and entirely to tape, the process captured the moments in the room.

    Jamestown Revival Upcoming Tour Dates (New Dates In Bold)
    Sept 27 - Santa Monica, CA @ Santa Monica Pier - Way Over Yonder
    Oct 05 - Austin, TX @ Zilker Park - Austin City Limits Festival
    Oct 07 - New Orleans, LA @ Gasa Gasa %
    Oct 08 - Jackson, MS @ Duling Hall %
    Oct 10 - Mobile, AL @ Soul Kitchen %
    Oct 11 - Birmingham, AL @ Cask & Drum Festival
    Nov 01 - Dallas, TX @ Gilley's Untapped Festival
    Nov 04 - Atlanta, GA @ The Loft *
    Nov 05 - Nashville, TN @ Mercy Lounge *
    Nov 07 - Washington, DC @ Gypsy Sally's ^ *
    Nov 08 - Philadelphia, PA @ North Star Bar ^ *
    Nov 09 - Teaneck, NJ @ Mexi Cali Live ^ *
    Nov 10 - New York, NY @ Bowery Ballroom ^ *
    Nov 12 - Cambridge, MA @ Middle East Downstairs ^ *
    Nov 14 - Pittsburgh, PA @ Hard Rock Café ^ ~
    Nov 15 - Columbus, OH @ The Basement ^ ~
    Nov 16 - Chicago, IL @ Double Door ^ ~
    Nov 18 - Minneapolis, MN @ Cedar Cultural Center ^ ~
    Nov 20 - Englewood, CO @ Gothic Theatre ^ ~
    Nov 21 - Aspen, CO @ Belly Up Aspen ^ ~
    Nov 22 - Salt Lake City, UT @ Urban Lounge ~
    Nov 25 - Seattle, WA @ Tractor Tavern ^
    Nov 26 - Portland, OR @ Doug Fir Lounge ^ *
    Nov 28 - San Francisco, CA @ Great American Music Hall ^ *
    Dec 02 - Phoenix, AZ @ The Crescent Ballroom ^ *
    Dec 03 - Santa Fe, NM @ Skylight ^ *
    Dec 05 - Houston, TX @ Fitzgerald's Downstairs ^ *
    Dec 06 - Austin, TX @ Emo's ^ *

    % w/Black Cadillacs
    * w/Pete Molinari
    ^ w/Nikki Lane
    ~ w/Hollow Wood

    More at jamestownrevival.com/


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    Just like the headline says, here's an official Guitar World video of Joe Satriani showing you how to play his signature 1987 tune, "Satch Boogie."

    Additional Content

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    We don't know about you, but around here, September brings to mind tours and massive live shows — probably because it's the only month where summer and fall, the two biggest rock touring seasons, collide.

    So, as our thoughts turn to the gigs we've reported on, witnessed and celebrated this year, we thought we'd get our readers — as in, you guys! — involved as we attempt to pinpoint rock's greatest live band or artist!

    Welcome to Guitar World's official readers poll for September (It's the first readers poll we've conducted since November 2013, all you poll haters out there), the Battle of the Greatest Live Bands. It kicked off Wednesday, September 3.

    Although we (obviously) had thousands of artists and/or bands to choose from, we decided to narrow things down to a mere 32 names, which is perfect for a month's worth of intense — and fun (it's supposed to be fun, people!) matchups. All the artists were carefully selected by Guitar World's entire editorial staff.

    Most importantly, note that this poll involves ONLY still-existing bands, so you won't get to watch the Doors duke it out with Led Zeppelin! Pantera will not go head to head with Cream. The Jimi Hendrix Experience will not compete with ... you get the idea.

    Here are our 32 artists, in alphabetical order:

    AC/DC, Aerosmith, Alice Cooper, the Allman Brothers Band, Black Sabbath, Dillinger Escape Plan, Eagles, Foo Fighters, Guns N’ Roses, Iron Maiden, Jack White, Kiss, Korn, Metallica, Muse, Nine Inch Nails, Paul McCartney, Pearl Jam, Phish, Queen, Radiohead, Rammstein, Red Hot Chili Peppers, the Rolling Stones, Rush, Slayer, Slipknot, Soundgarden, Tool, U2, Van Halen and ZZ Top.


    Here's how the bracket was — very unscientifically — compiled:

    We drew the artists' names out of a hat (It was, in fact, a Quebec Nordiques baseball-style cap) to help us create our bracket, which is available for your viewing pleasure below. Obviously, none of these of bands are ranked or come from a previously compiled list, so we chose purely random matchups to have as little impact as possible on the final outcome. We're actually pretty pleased with the way the bracket turned out!

    Remember that, as with any poll, genre might occasionally clash against genre, so you'll just need to decide which artist has (or has had) the most to offer within his/their genre, perhaps which one has or had more natural talent or technical skill, which one had the biggest influence on other live acts, etc.

    Let's get started! As always, you can vote only once per matchup (once per device, that is), and we'll be posting matchups pretty much every day of the month, sometimes more than once per day, just to give you an early warning!

    This matchup finds Iron Maiden going head to head with Aerosmith!

    Head HERE to see every matchup so far.

    Behold the Current Bracket!

    2010.09.06 Bracket

    Yesterday's Winners

    Van Halen (78.98 percent) defeated Nine Inch Nails (21.02 percent), and Rush (88.43) defeated Korn (11.57). Thanks for voting!

    Voting Closed!

    Slipknot (53.05 percent) defeated Kiss (46.95 percent), and Iron Maiden (79.34) destroyed Aerosmith (20.66). Thanks for voting!

    Additional Content

    0 0

    We don't know about you, but around here, September brings to mind tours and massive live shows — probably because it's the only month where summer and fall, the two biggest rock touring seasons, collide.

    So, as our thoughts turn to the gigs we've reported on, witnessed and celebrated this year, we thought we'd get our readers — as in, you guys! — involved as we attempt to pinpoint rock's greatest live band or artist!

    Welcome to Guitar World's official readers poll for September (It's the first readers poll we've conducted since November 2013, all you poll haters out there), the Battle of the Greatest Live Bands. It kicked off Wednesday, September 3.

    Although we (obviously) had thousands of artists and/or bands to choose from, we decided to narrow things down to a mere 32 names, which is perfect for a month's worth of intense — and fun (it's supposed to be fun, people!) matchups. All the artists were carefully selected by Guitar World's entire editorial staff.

    Most importantly, note that this poll involves ONLY still-existing bands, so you won't get to watch the Doors duke it out with Led Zeppelin! Pantera will not go head to head with Cream. The Jimi Hendrix Experience will not compete with ... you get the idea.

    Here are our 32 artists, in alphabetical order:

    AC/DC, Aerosmith, Alice Cooper, the Allman Brothers Band, Black Sabbath, Dillinger Escape Plan, Eagles, Foo Fighters, Guns N’ Roses, Iron Maiden, Jack White, Kiss, Korn, Metallica, Muse, Nine Inch Nails, Paul McCartney, Pearl Jam, Phish, Queen, Radiohead, Rammstein, Red Hot Chili Peppers, the Rolling Stones, Rush, Slayer, Slipknot, Soundgarden, Tool, U2, Van Halen and ZZ Top.


    Here's how the bracket was — very unscientifically — compiled:

    We drew the artists' names out of a hat (It was, in fact, a Quebec Nordiques baseball-style cap) to help us create our bracket, which is available for your viewing pleasure below. Obviously, none of these of bands are ranked or come from a previously compiled list, so we chose purely random matchups to have as little impact as possible on the final outcome. We're actually pretty pleased with the way the bracket turned out!

    Remember that, as with any poll, genre might occasionally clash against genre, so you'll just need to decide which artist has (or has had) the most to offer within his/their genre, perhaps which one has or had more natural talent or technical skill, which one had the biggest influence on other live acts, etc.

    Let's get started! As always, you can vote only once per matchup (once per device, that is), and we'll be posting matchups pretty much every day of the month, sometimes more than once per day, just to give you an early warning!

    This matchup finds Slipknot going head to head with Kiss!

    Head HERE to see every matchup so far.

    Behold the Current Bracket!

    2010.09.06 Bracket

    Yesterday's Winners

    Van Halen (78.98 percent) defeated Nine Inch Nails (21.02 percent), and Rush (88.43) defeated Korn (11.57). Thanks for voting!

    Voting Closed!

    Slipknot (53.05 percent) defeated Kiss (46.95 percent), and Iron Maiden (79.34) destroyed Aerosmith (20.66). Thanks for voting!

    Additional Content

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    The all-new October 2014 issue of Guitar World is available now!

    In the new issue, we celebrate blues giants Stevie Ray Vaughan with an in-depth examination of his 30 greatest recordings — from “Texas Flood” to “Riviera Paradise,” from “Couldn’t Stand the Weather” to “The Sky is Crying." Read about how Stevie Ray Vaughan and Double Trouble (bassist Tommy Shannon and drummer Chris Layton) didn’t walk into Jackson Browne’s Down Town Studio in Los Angeles in late 1982 with highfalutin plans about recording their monster debut album. In fact, their sites were set much lower.

    Also, Metallica’s Kirk Hammett teaches you how to play like the great bluesman SRV. Then blues legend Buddy Guy pays tribute to his late friend. We go up close and personal with Stevie’s favorite Strat, which is now on display at the Grammy Museum in L.A.

    Then, Guitar World features John 5, the prophet of the Telecaster who shows us some rare mint-condition Teles from his collection and talks about his latest album, Careful with That Axe.

    Next, as the prog legends take their classic Fragile and Close to the Edge albums on the road, guitar virtuoso Steve Howe sits down for a talk about the making of those groundbreaking productions.

    Finally, as the curvaceous Fender Stratocaster marks six decades of innovation and influence, Guitar World celebrates its legacy via 60 players, songs, solos and historical moments.

    PLUS: An ode to the late Johnny Winter, a PureSalem guitar review, Satchel's Man of Steel column returns and much more!

    Five Songs with Tabs for Guitar and Bass

    • Stevie Ray Vaughan - "Look at Little Sister"
    • Stevie Ray Vaughan - "Testify"
    • Scorpions - "Rock You Like a Hurricane"
    • Within The Ruins - "Gods Amongst Men"
    • Magic - "Rude"

    Head to the Guitar World Online Store now!

    Screen Shot 2014-08-12 at 3.40.45 PM.png


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    We don't know about you, but around here, September brings to mind tours and massive live shows — probably because it's the only month where summer and fall, the two biggest rock touring seasons, collide.

    So, as our thoughts turn to the gigs we've reported on, witnessed and celebrated this year, we thought we'd get our readers — as in, you guys! — involved as we attempt to pinpoint rock's greatest live band or artist!

    Welcome to Guitar World's official readers poll for September (It's the first readers poll we've conducted since November 2013, all you poll haters out there), the Battle of the Greatest Live Bands. It kicked off Wednesday, September 3.

    Although we (obviously) had thousands of artists and/or bands to choose from, we decided to narrow things down to a mere 32 names, which is perfect for a month's worth of intense — and fun (it's supposed to be fun, people!) matchups. All the artists were carefully selected by Guitar World's entire editorial staff.

    Most importantly, note that this poll involves ONLY still-existing bands, so you won't get to watch the Doors duke it out with Led Zeppelin! Pantera will not go head to head with Cream. The Jimi Hendrix Experience will not compete with ... you get the idea.

    Here are our 32 artists, in alphabetical order:

    AC/DC, Aerosmith, Alice Cooper, the Allman Brothers Band, Black Sabbath, Dillinger Escape Plan, Eagles, Foo Fighters, Guns N’ Roses, Iron Maiden, Jack White, Kiss, Korn, Metallica, Muse, Nine Inch Nails, Paul McCartney, Pearl Jam, Phish, Queen, Radiohead, Rammstein, Red Hot Chili Peppers, the Rolling Stones, Rush, Slayer, Slipknot, Soundgarden, Tool, U2, Van Halen and ZZ Top.


    Here's how the bracket was — very unscientifically — compiled:

    We drew the artists' names out of a hat (It was, in fact, a Quebec Nordiques baseball-style cap) to help us create our bracket, which is available for your viewing pleasure below. Obviously, none of these of bands are ranked or come from a previously compiled list, so we chose purely random matchups to have as little impact as possible on the final outcome. We're actually pretty pleased with the way the bracket turned out!l

    Remember that, as with any poll, genre might occasionally clash against genre, so you'll just need to decide which artist has (or has had) the most to offer within his/their genre, perhaps which one has or had more natural talent or technical skill, which one had the biggest influence on other live acts, etc.

    Let's get started! As always, you can vote only once per matchup (once per device, that is), and we'll be posting matchups pretty much every day of the month, sometimes more than once per day, just to give you an early warning!

    This matchup finds Paul McCartney going head to head with the Eagles!

    Head HERE to see every matchup so far.

    Behold the Current Bracket!

    2014.09.07 bracket

    Yesterday's Winners

    Slipknot (53.05 percent) defeated Kiss (46.95 percent), and Iron Maiden (79.34) destroyed Aerosmith (20.66). Thanks for voting!

    Vote Now!

    Today, Paul McCartney goes head to head with the Eagles. We don't need to tell you anything about these artists. We'll let the videos below do the talking. Vote now!

    Additional Content

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    Go ahead. Ask guitarist Jack Pearson about his tours of duty with the Allman Brothers Band and Gregg Allman’s solo band.

    Ask him about jamming with jazz greats like Jimmy Raney, Mundell Lowe and Jimmy Smith.

    Or about sharing the stage and/or studio with the likes of everyone from bluegrass legend Earl Scruggs and the late Vassar Clements to modern-day bluesman Keb Mo’ and the hard-rockin’ Gov’t Mule—not to mention leading his own ensembles as well as his body of solo studio work.

    Ask Pearson about all that, and you know what he will most likely do? He’ll probably shrug his shoulders, smile, and say in his soft Southern drawl, “Yeah, well … some folks would say, ‘That Pearson boy just can’t keep a job!’”

    The fact of the matter is, 54-year-old Pearson has made—and continues to make—some incredible music. His fluency in an array of styles, combined with his easy-going attitude, make him a picker’s picker, the kind of musician other musicians admire and dig playing with.

    One recent recorded example of Pearson’s talents is his performance on the All My Friends: A Tribute to Gregg Allman CD/DVD set released earlier this year. As part of the house band for the evening, Pearson backed an all-star cast of performers (as well as Allman himself) on a selection of songs from Allman's career, both as a solo artist and with the Allman Brothers Band.

    Teamed up with Audley Freed (another guitarist who doesn't get anywhere close to the credit he deserves), Pearson paid homage to Duane Allman and Dickey Betts at various points in the evening, channeling and quoting some of their iconic licks while retaining his own particular voice.

    If one had to pick a single example of what Pearson is all about from that evening, “Ain’t Wastin’ Time No More” would do the trick (Watch the video below). While current-generation country star Eric Church guests on vocals, working himself up into a televangelist-style lather, Pearson simply stands in place and blows the roof off Atlanta’s Fox Theatre. He puts a unique spin on the mid-song break (Betts was on slide for the original, post-Duane), then takes off on a flight path of his own on the outro.

    The solo is powerful, yet tasteful; Pearson takes his time building the beast, making his final statement with the slide from somewhere around the bridge pickup on the treble string. As amazing as it is to listen to, you absolutely gotta watch the video: Pearson looks like he’s waiting for the bus while everyone else in the Fox Theatre is picking their jaw up off the floor.

    And the topper on the cake? He was playing an off-the-rack Squier Bullet. That pretty much sums up Pearson in a nutshell.

    I recently had a chance to talk to Pearson about some of his practice habits, his musical influences and his new online venture, the Jack Pearson Guitar Academy.

    GUITAR WORLD: Jack, when you’re home, are you most like to pick up an acoustic guitar or an electric and an amp?

    Well … [laughs] when I’m home, I don't plug in and rock out; I usually sit at my table and play quietly unplugged—or with my acoustic.

    An electric guitar has to respond unplugged. Like that Squier Bullet I played during the Gregg tribute show? I never plugged it in at the store, but I knew it would be a great guitar. I just played it acoustically. It had the most response and vibrated great … had a lot of sustain. I’ve had a couple friends play it and they didn’t see any big deal about it—but the low notes are really tight and the high notes have a certain quality.

    How about practice time during an average week?

    Oh, it depends; I sure don't get to do it as much as I want to! [laughs] I try to play every day and try to practice every night. When I come home from a gig, I’ll usually sit and play for an hour or two.

    After you’ve been playing at the gig?

    Well, you know … you’ve been playing, but you don't always get to play what you want to. And I’m always trying to learn something new; studying different things. I’m still working on it … I’ve been working on it for over 40 years! [laughs]

    Was there any one person or any one musical moment that inspired you to play as a boy?

    I wanted to play before I could even reach around a guitar. My mama said she had to buy me a toy guitar at the store because I wanted one so bad.

    I do remember seeing my oldest brother play—he was 18 years older than me. He came over to visit—he was married by then and had a couple of kids of his own—and he’d bring his guitar with him. He was in the bedroom playing and I just knew right then I wanted to do that.

    For me, I’ve got one brother, 14 years older than me. When I was little, my chore was to sit on the bed alongside him and turn the pages of the Johnny Cash songbook at the right moment … or else.

    Well, there you go. [laughter] My brother showed me what he knew; he was always pulling out a record and saying, “Here, boy—learn how to play this.” He gave me a chart of the fingerboard and he made me memorize the notes, which is something he never did. I remember him telling me, “I didn't learn this, but you need to.”

    I’d been playing guitar about a year when my brother brought me a slide, my first slide. He told me, “I don't know how to do this, but you need to know how.” His name was Stanley. He died in 2008.

    I’m sorry, Jack. What a gift he gave you.

    He sure did. I remember him writing out a chart for me to learn the fingerboard; did that for every key. That’s something I stress that to the younger musicians: “You need to know where the notes are on the neck.” That goes right back to that first lesson with my brother.

    And what younger folks need to realize is, that was back in a time when you couldn't stop and restart a song you were trying to learn by clicking a mouse …

    No, no, no! [laughter]

    You were sitting there with a record player, picking the needle up and dropping it back down.

    I went through a lot of copies of records—several versions of my favorites. I'd try to be as careful as I could and not scratch them … it was devastating if I scratched a record back then. Things weren’t as disposable as they are now, you know? I used to watch the TV and if there was a guitar player doing something, I'd run to my room and get my guitar and try to learn it.

    And there wasn’t even a lot of that to watch.

    People are spoiled now. I mean, I am. [laughter]

    I go on YouTube and I get to watch Wes Montgomery and Django Reinhardt and everybody like that. I never saw Django until a couple of years ago, you know? I’ve got stacks of LPs and CDs of him … he’s still one of my favorites ever. But getting to see him play; see his hands and how he held the guitar? I don't know … it means a lot to me.

    Which leads us to your Jack Pearson Guitar Academy, where folks can go to watch, learn and digest at their own pace.

    We worked on the design for two years. One thing that took a long time was setting up the search engine so that people could type in what they were looking for—say, something about their right hand or left; a dominant 7th or I-VI-II-V chord changes. If you do a search, it’ll bring up videos that have that in it.

    Super. That’s a very handy feature. I know some of the clips I’ve watched have been a mix of all sorts of things.

    For instance, some of the videos are just me practicing because people have asked me how I practice. I don't know if anybody else does that, but I wanted everybody to see it. Private lessons are expensive … and guitar players usually don't have any money. [laughter] One of my goals for the website was to have it be so that people could afford to learn, you know?

    And folks subscribe to your Guitar Academy lessons, correct?

    Uh-huh. And once you subscribe, you have access to everything in here … and there’s a ton of stuff. We're adding things every week. It's loaded. At this point, I’m adding stuff that’s variations on things I put up earlier. It’s really just me explaining the way I play.

    One of the things I enjoyed was the easy-going vibe of the videos. It’s like the viewer’s just sitting there in the living room with you, hanging out. There are technical things to learn, but you have a nice way of doling it out.

    Every video’s different. Sometimes I’ll play for two or three minutes and then I’ll talk about what I just played. But what you said is what I wanted to do: have it feel like we're just sitting around.

    It's great that you’re putting this out there, Jack.

    Well … you’ve got to pass some of it along. Like my brother did for me all those years ago.

    A former offshore lobsterman, Brian Robbins had to wait a good four decades or so to write about the stuff he wanted to when he was 15. Today he’s a freelance scribe, cartoonist, photographer and musician. His home on the worldwide inner tube is at brian-robbins.com (And there’s that Facebook thing too.)


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    We don't know about you, but around here, September brings to mind tours and massive live shows — probably because it's the only month where summer and fall, the two biggest rock touring seasons, collide.

    So, as our thoughts turn to the gigs we've reported on, witnessed and celebrated this year, we thought we'd get our readers — as in, you guys! — involved as we attempt to pinpoint rock's greatest live band or artist!

    Welcome to Guitar World's official readers poll for September (It's the first readers poll we've conducted since November 2013, all you poll haters out there), the Battle of the Greatest Live Bands. It kicked off Wednesday, September 3.

    Although we (obviously) had thousands of artists and/or bands to choose from, we decided to narrow things down to a mere 32 names, which is perfect for a month's worth of intense — and fun (it's supposed to be fun, people!) matchups. All the artists were carefully selected by Guitar World's entire editorial staff.

    Most importantly, note that this poll involves ONLY still-existing bands, so you won't get to watch the Doors duke it out with Led Zeppelin! Pantera will not go head to head with Cream. The Jimi Hendrix Experience will not compete with ... you get the idea.

    Here are our 32 artists, in alphabetical order:

    AC/DC, Aerosmith, Alice Cooper, the Allman Brothers Band, Black Sabbath, Dillinger Escape Plan, Eagles, Foo Fighters, Guns N’ Roses, Iron Maiden, Jack White, Kiss, Korn, Metallica, Muse, Nine Inch Nails, Paul McCartney, Pearl Jam, Phish, Queen, Radiohead, Rammstein, Red Hot Chili Peppers, the Rolling Stones, Rush, Slayer, Slipknot, Soundgarden, Tool, U2, Van Halen and ZZ Top.

    How the Bracket Was Compiled

    Here's how the bracket was — very unscientifically — compiled.

    We drew the artists' names out of a hat (It was, in fact, a Quebec Nordiques baseball-style cap) to help us create our bracket, which is available for your viewing pleasure below. Obviously, none of these of bands are ranked or come from a previously compiled list, so we chose purely random matchups to have as little impact as possible on the final outcome. We're actually pretty pleased with the way the bracket turned out!

    Remember that, as with any poll, genre might occasionally clash against genre, so you'll just need to decide which artist has (or has had) the most to offer within his/their genre, perhaps which one has or had more natural talent or technical skill, which one had the biggest influence on other live acts, etc.

    Let's get started! As always, you can vote only once per matchup (once per device, that is), and we'll be posting matchups pretty much every day of the month, sometimes more than once per day, just to give you an early warning!

    Today's matchup finds SOUNDGARDEN going head to head with ZZ TOP!

    Behold the Latest Bracket

    2014.09.08 32 Bracket



    Today's Matchup: Vote Now!

    SOUNDGARDEN goes head to head with ZZ TOP. We don't need to tell you about these bands. We'll let the recently shot videos below do the talking! Vote now; you have one full day! We'll be posting two matchups tomorrow, September 9. Good luck!

    Yesterday's Winner

    Former Beatle Paul McCartney (53.62) defeated the Eagles (46.38). Thanks for voting! Head HERE to see every matchup so far. Tell your friends so that they, too, can see every matchup so far!

    Let's Go to the Video!

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    It's finally happened! Los Straitjackets and roots-music legend Deke Dickerson have combined forces to record an album, Los Straitjackets: Deke Dickerson Sings The Instrumental Hits.

    Today, GuitarWorld.com presents the exclusive premiere of a track from the album, which will be released October 7 via Yep Roc Records. Check out "You Can't Count on Me" below — and be sure to tell us what you think in the comments or on Facebook.

    If you find the album's title confusing, you'll understand once you hear "You Can't Count on Me," which is sung to the tune of "Hawaii 5-0." It's an album of famous instrumental songs with "lost" or rewritten lyrics.

    “America’s Number 1 instrumental combo and I decided that six knuckleheads were better than one and that joining forces for an album’s worth of vocal instrumentals was yet another mountain that needed be to climbed,” says Dickerson, who has written several columns for GuitarWorld.com. “It is the first album of its kind, and it is required to be in your collection!"

    The Grammy-nominated Los Straitjackets have toured the world the world and elsewhere, released 11 studio albums and found the time to record and tour with Reverend Horton Heat, Tom Petty and The Heartbreakers and Big Sandy (to name just a few).

    Dickerson was the frontman for Missouri's Untamed Youth. Since then, every project (including the Dave and Deke Combo, the Go Nuts, Blind Rage and Violence) has brought his unparalleled musicianship and flair for entertainment to the forefront. He has collaborated with many of his heroes including Duane Eddy, Larry Collins of the Collins Kids, Randy Fuller (of the Bobby Fuller Four) and the Trashmen.

    You'll find a complete track list and Straitjackets/Dickerson's latest tour dates below the YouTube player. For more about Los Straitjackets, visit straitjackets.com. For more about Dickerson, visit dekedickerson.com.

    Los Straitjackets: Deke Dickerson Sings The Instrumental Hits Track Listing:
    1. Fury
    2. Honky Tonk
    3. Magic Star
    4. Theme From A Summer Place
    5. Perfidia
    6. Apache
    7. Misirlou
    8. Kawanga
    9. Wild Weekend
    10. You Can Count On Me
    11. Walk Don’t Run
    12. Popcorn
    13. Sleepwalk
    14. Pipeline

    2014 Tour Dates:
    10/15 - Kansas City, MO @ Knuckleheads
    10/16 - Columbia, MO @ Mojo's
    10/17 - St. Louis, MO @ Off Broadway
    10/18 - Berywyn, IL @ FitzGerald's
    10/19 - Rapids, MI @ Tip Top Grand
    10/21 - Detroit, MI @ Magic Bag
    10/22 - Cincinatti, OH @ Southgate House Revival
    10/23 - Columbus, OH @ Woodlands Tavern
    10/24 - Pittsburgh, PA @ Club Cafe
    10/25 - Cleveland, OH @ Beachland Ballroom
    10/26 - Buffalo, NY @ Sportsmen's Tavern
    10/28 - New Haven, CT @ Cafe 9
    10/30 - Cambridge, MA @ The Sinclair
    10/31 - Brooklyn, NY @ Bell House
    11/01 - Washington, DC @ Gypsy Sally's
    11/02 - Philadelphia, PA @ World Cafe Live


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    Sit down. Put your headphones on. Take a deep breath and get ready for something spectacular.

    Yes, I’m talking about a new EP from soulful R&B artist Aryk Crowder, 2x4 Vol. 1.

    Due out on September 9, 2x4 Vol. 1 is a collection of four lush and gorgeous songs featuring simple rhythms, finger snaps, and clear and ringing acoustic guitar instrumentation. But the star of the show is Crowder’s smoky tone and silky delivery.

    Crowder's writing skills are also apparent here, as he combines solid composition with well-written lyrics. A lovely finish the collection, the closing song, “Feel Loved,” is supported by some sweet strings. My favorite of the bunch, it’s wonderfully written and performed.

    Crowder shares, “Working on 2x4 Vol. 1 was an incredible experience as it is not only my biggest project to date, but also that I got to work with such a great team on it. The musicians and engineers behind this record are by far the best people I have worked with. Not only are they all my friends, but as a team we work well and the bring the best out of me. They let me feel comfortable in being vulnerable on these songs and open to new ideas. I couldn't have made this record the same way without them."

    Listen here:

    2x4 Vol. 1 is the first half of a two-part EP series, with Volume 2 due to release next spring. Though comparisons to Jeff Buckley, John Mayer or Ben Harper aren't unwarranted, Crowder sports more love for true soul music than any of the above, as evidenced through the rustic tones of acoustic plucks.

    Though the focus is on Crowder's expert vocals and masterful guitar work throughout, the 2x4 Vol. 1 is rounded out by hefty contributions from award winning hip-hop group, Sidewalk Chalk members Charlie Coffeen and Tyler Berg (co-production/keys and drums, respectively), engineer Chris Harden (Plain White T's, Hard Working Americans) of IV Lab Studios and Boiler Room mastering engineerColin Jordan, responsible for assisting a who's who of Chicago hip-hop talent over the years, such as Kanye West, Lupe Fiasco, and Twista.

    Crowder began his quest for success in the heart of Chicago, after perfecting his debut EP Ready, Set in 2010. Crowder released his next record Over Getting Over in 2012, which was recorded and co-produced by Greg Magers (Lupe Fiasco, Umphree's McGee).

    Excited for his upcoming release, Crowder explains, "After working on 2x4 for nearly 18 months since the creation of the concept, I feel like a proud papa with his new baby. I've been blessed to call Chicago home as the talent here in the soul, R&B, and hip hop scene is in abundance. It was great to be able to work with so many great, creative, Chicago folks on this record who believe in me and the music I'm making and that I can call friends. I feel as if this record will be what I need to start taking my music on a national level. I anticipate the next year to be nothing short of amazing."

    Aryk Crowder is set to release 2x4 Vol. 1 on September 9, 2014.For updates, please visit: arykcrowder.com.


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    According to Gene Simmons of Kiss, rock is dead.

    "Rock is finally dead," he told Esquire.

    "The death of rock was not a natural death. Rock did not die of old age. It was murdered."

    Simmons blames file sharing and the fact that no one values music "enough to pay you for it."

    "It's very sad for new bands," he added. "My heart goes out to them. They just don't have a chance. If you play guitar, it's almost impossible. You're better off not even learning how to play guitar or write songs, and just singing in the shower and auditioning for The X Factor.

    "And I'm not slamming The X Factor or pop singers. But where's the next Bob Dylan? Where's the next Beatles? Where are the songwriters? Where are the creators? Many of them now have to work behind the scenes, to prop up pop acts and write their stuff for them."

    Simmons added that 1958 to 1983 was music's pinnacle. Simmons can name only two bands that have carried on the spirit of that era, since that time: Nirvana and, surprisingly, Tame Impala. Yes, Tame Impala.

    "The craft is gone, and that is what technology, in part, has brought us. What is the next Dark Side of the Moon? Now that the record industry barely exists, they wouldn't have a chance to make something like that. There is a reason that, along with the usual top-40 juggernauts, some of the biggest touring bands are half old people, like me.

    "My sense is that file sharing started in predominantly white, middle- and upper-middle-class young people who were native-born, who felt they were entitled to have something for free, because that's what they were used to. If you believe in capitalism — and I'm a firm believer in free-market capitalism — then that other model is chaos. It destroys the structure.

    "I find that many of the more patriotic people are immigrants."

    Foo Fighters shared Simmons'"Rock is finally dead" interview on their Facebook page, adding "Not so fast, Mr. God of Thunder..." Dave Grohl and company will release their new album, Sonic Highways, November 10.

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    Boston’s Will Dailey hit a career milestone with new album National Throat that debuted in the top 20 on the Billboard Heatseekers chart.

    National Throat, inspired by a souring relationship with Will’s former business partner, is Dailey’s first release in seven years without a major label and the first charting position of Will’s career.

    Dailey willingly walked away from the largest label in the world, took charge and involved his fans in a communal creative process through Pledge Music to make National Throat.

    “Do I care about chart positions...not particularly,” says Dailey. “I never had to ask myself that until now though and it does feel great. I do care about great songs and tracking them. National Throat Charting in the top 20 on the Heatseekers chart for me means that that a large number of people connected to its story. That's a huge accomplishment I shared with my fans, band, team members and even Boston. That's what started and supported this journey of making this album a communal process. There is no such thing as DIY.”

    The title National Throat was inspired by a protest essay written by John Phillip Sousa called "The Menace of Mechanical Music." Faced with the advent of the recording of music (the invention of the Gramophone) and an onslaught of innovation, Sousa feared the sacred creative entity he had dedicated his entire life to serve would be forever ruined by technology. Nearly a century later, with music treading on similar fault line, Dailey asks these same questions with National Throat.

    Here's his official video for "Sunken Ship"

    The release of this record is the tip of the iceberg for Dailey who will continue to play shows through the end of the year including a tour of France later this month.

    More at http://willdailey.com/


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    FROM THE GW ARCHIVE: Paul Gilbert answered readers' questions in 2010.

    I’m a big fan of your guitar tone. What do you consider to be the key element to your sound? — Thomas Hartley

    I first began having success picking on a guitar that wasn’t plugged in. I was picking really hard so I could hear it acoustically, and when I plugged into an amp, I was surprised that it didn’t sound very good. I discovered that the way I attack the string really affects the tone. Modifying your picking attack—for clean tone, distortion and playing on an acoustic—makes a huge difference in the sound.

    With solos and shredding becoming popular again, do you think the younger players are falling into the trap of flash over substance? — Lorne

    Well, I’d probably have to listen to more young players. [laughs] Actually, I’ve done a lot of teaching lately, and I’m really impressed with the kids that are coming in. In general, their technique is genuinely good. I’m pleasantly surprised by that.

    Have you ever thought about doing a traditional blues album? — Pauly

    I did a bluesy album [Raw Blues Power, 2002] with my uncle, Jimi Kidd, who was a huge influence on me when I was younger. But traditional blues? I don’t know. I like some of the really dirty traditional blues, like John Lee Hooker. But for that stuff, those guys are out of tune and the bars go too long, and you hear the bass player change a second later than the other guys. That stuff really gives it its down-and-dirty feeling. I think I’d have to start drinking a lot more to really do it right. [laughs] I don’t know if it’s possible. When you say “traditional” I take it seriously enough to know probably not to go there! [laughs]

    How did you develop your string-skipping and legato playing over the years? — Anthony Padilla

    The legato playing that I do is very intuitive, and I learned it through a lot of good accidents. I used to sit around and play to Eddie Van Halen, doing it wrong and coming up with my own patterns. The string-skipping stuff involved taking those same patterns and translating them into string-skipping licks. It was quite easy, thanks to the way I pick, which is mostly outside pickin. It was such a great discovery: suddenly I had a new bag of licks, and with very little effort.

    Is it true that you used to pick using only upstrokes? Did reggae players influence your approach? — Jeff Dunne

    The upstrokes came from lack of knowledge rather than from reggae. I started playing by ear at age nine. I had no idea how to play, and for some reason upstrokes felt good. I was talking to Scott Henderson, the amazing fusion guitar player, and he said an interesting thing about the architecture of the guitar: that it is essentially six separate instruments. Because each string is tuned differently, they all have a different feel, they’re in different places, and you have to learn the notes on each one.

    That may be simplified, but some of the art of learning guitar is to learn each of those six instruments, and that’s how I started, unwittingly. I spent two years learning the low E string before I finally took a lesson and a teacher taught me how to tune the other five. It was a grueling way to learn. [laughs] Chords sound so much better! But that’s how I learned: a lot of upstrokes on that E string, and learning every Led Zeppelin riff I could that way.

    You are often lumped in with shredders like John Petrucci. Considering your opinion of your own style, would you prefer to be put in a group with him or someone like Jimmy Page or Randy Rhoads? — Enrique Angeles

    I think as a fan and as a listener: Jimmy Page and Randy Rhoads are where I was coming from. John is certainly a great guitar player, and some of the Dream Theater stuff is killer. And where we’ve ended up is similar: our styles have crossed paths, as far the kind of picking we do and our modern shred tone. I’ve done some tribute gigs with Mike Portnoy, and he said John’s influences are really different than mine.

    Apparently, John was really into progressive rock, like Rush. I love Rush, but at the same time, I have a feeling I went a lot deeper into the pop music of the Beatles, Todd Rundgren and Cheap Trick. It would be a huge honor to be in either category. But I’ve gotta say, if I look to my right, I’ve got a big poster of Jimmy Page hanging on my wall.

    Do you think you’ll ever get back with your old Racer X buddies for another album or tour? — Ryan

    On this tour that’s coming up, I’m actually bringing Bruce Bouillet, the other guitarist for Racer X. It’s really exciting, because he’s been producing underground for awhile. We’re certainly doing some Racer X songs on my tour. But yeah, if we’re all feeling some heavy metal, it’d be great doing another Racer X record.

    Brad Angle Google +

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    Ah, memories.

    We've glanced at the albums that defined 1984. Then we checked in with 50 albums that characterized 1994.

    Now it's 2004's turn!

    It was a year that saw tragedy—and a sea change in mainstream rock and guitar-centric music.

    In 2004, the landscape of mainstream rock was jarred once again by Green Day's American Idiot. An incredibly ambitious rock opera that touched on politics, depression and suburban ennui, it shifted millions of copies and re-established the trio as the American pop-punk band.

    Having had the way paved by Green Day's unbelievable success, pop-punk, melodic hardcore and emo had a field day in 2004, beginning an incredible run of mainstream success that not only brought in a fresh second wave of aggressive, melodic pop-punk to the fore, but one that has yet to entirely subside.

    Metal had a tough year, losing one of its most beloved representatives in a horrendous tragedy. Darrel Abbott, known to the world as Dimebag Darrell, was performing with his new band Damageplan (from the ashes of the hugely influential Pantera) when his life was cut short by a crazed gunman.

    Although the White Stripes didn't release anything new, the garage-rock revival craze could be felt in new records from the Hives and the Vines. England prepared for a second invasion with stunning debut albums from bands like the Futureheads and Franz Ferdinand. Arcade Fire made their extraordinary debut with Funeral, as did TV On the Radio with Desperate Youth, Blood Thirsty Babes.

    Over all, it was a year of transition, one where few things felt all that stable. The mainstream was fluid, seemingly waiting for rock's next big move. Two thousand four was a year where many of rock's trends of the next 10 years either began or took their first steps.


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