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    Clarence White was a genuine double threat.

    His brilliant, Doc Watson-inspired acoustic flatpicking, which incorporated lightning-fast fiddle lines played on a vintage Martin D-28, helped the bluegrass world recognize the guitar as a lead instrument.

    Several masters of the genre, including Tony Rice and Norman Blake, site him as a key influence.

    As an electric guitarist, White built the bridge between country and rock in the late Sixties. His work with the Parsons/White StringBender— an ingenious B-string-pulling device invented and installed in White's 1954 Fender Telecaster by fellow Byrd, multi-instrumentalist and machinist Gene Parsons — is legendary.

    Whether employing a crisp, bell-like tone (the Byrds'"Tulsa County") or a touch of fuzz (the Flying Burrito Brothers'"The Train Song"), White inserted his dancing, whimsical runs into songs with confidence, knowing that a little can often go a long way.

    White, a member of the Byrds, Nashville West, Muleskinner and the Kentucky Colonels (and the New Kentucky Colonels), also was an in-demand session player who recorded with Arlo Guthrie, Wynn Stewart, Wayne Moore, Gary Paxton, the Monkees, Joe Cocker and Jackson Browne, to name just a few. He was killed by a drunk driver after a gig in California on July 14, 1973, never getting to fully grasp the influence he'd have on bluegrass, country and rock.

    There really aren't that many "Clarence White in action" videos to be found on YouTube, but I hope I've collected a decent sampling of clips that represent his skills.

    Before we get started, if you want to know more about White — before, during and after the Byrds — check out this well-researched and well-compiled site, burritobrother.com. Enjoy!


    "You Ain't Going Nowhere," The Byrds

    Because the Byrds'Sweetheart of the Rodeo version of this Bob Dylan tune highlights pedal steel guitar (courtesy of the great Lloyd Green, who I'd love to interview), we suggest you check out a slightly later live rendition instead — like this one from a 1968 TV appearance.

    It puts the emphasis on White, his still-Nudie-sticker-free Fender Telecaster and his Parsons/White StringBender (not to mention some fine-looking Sixties women).




    "I Am a Pilgrim" / "Soldier's Joy," Clarence White, Roland White and Bob Baxter

    Here's White (on the left, with the beard) on the Bob Baxter Guitar Workshop, a local LA-area TV show from 1973, performing a — what I consider — mind-blowing medley of "I Am a Pilgrim" and "Soldier's Joy" with his brother, Roland, on mandolin and the show's host, Bob Baxter, on second guitar (later joined by Byron Berline on fiddle and Alan Munde on banjo).

    What I can say about this video? First of all, it's rare in that it shows White's fingering and fretwork up close. Second, there's White unusual sense of timing in the first tune ("I Am a Pilgrim"); it's as if he's throwing in chord substitutions like a jazzer, while Roland plays it straight on mandolin. It can be disconcerting and confusing, but I love it.

    This performance is from a DVD called Clarence White: Guitar Workshop, which is available through Sierra Records, right here.

    To hear White playing more bluegrass, check out the Flatpick album on Amazon.com and the extended Collector's Edition of Flatpick on sierrarecords.goestores.com.




    "Nashville West," Nashville West

    No Clarence White playlist would be complete without what some would consider his signature song.

    Although White recorded the official studio version with the Byrds (plus an earlier studio version under his own name), here's a stripped-down 1968 (several sources say 1967) El Monte, California, club-date version by another of White's bands, Nashville West, which featured Gene Parsons on drums.




    "Time Between," The Byrds

    Feel free to argue, but if you had to choose one album that best demonstrates White's electric-guitar prowess, it would be Live at the Fillmore: February 1969 by the Byrds.

    The musicians on the album are Roger McGuinn on a 12-string Rickenbacker 360, Gene Parsons on drums, John York on bass and Clarence White on the B-Bender Tele. He never puts it down, so there's no escaping it.

    While the most impressive guitar track on the album is the band's cover of Buck Owens'"Buckaroo," that song isn't available on YouTube. Here, however, is a Chris Hillman composition, "Time Between," from the same live album. It's a nice coincidence that White appeared on the Byrds' original 1967 version of this song, back when he was an LA session musician.




    "Dark Hollow," Muleskinner

    Did I mention White could sing? He was actually a fine vocalist with a distinctive, deep voice that was just right for bluegrass and the spaced-out-Americana material the Byrds were recording from 1969 to 1972. Here's another live YouTube appearance by White, this time with Muleskinner, one of his post-Byrds bands, in 1973.




    "Hummingbyrd," Marty Stuart

    OK, here's a bonus for you. White's legendary B-Bender-equipped Telecaster is still in action, courtesy of country music artist Marty Stuart, who bought the guitar from White's family several years ago.

    Check out this live performance of "Hummingbyrd," an instrumental B-bending piece Stuart wrote — and titled — as a tribute to White. The studio version of "Hummingbyrd" can be found on Stuart's 2010 album, Ghost Train: The Studio B Sessions.

    "I always felt a little guilty about not having a recital piece for that guitar," Stuart told Guitar Player in 2010. "With 'Hummingbyrd,' I feel like I finally recorded a song that honors that guitar properly."

    Damian Fanelli is the online managing editor at Guitar World (and a B-bending guitarist who collects B-bender-equipped guitars; he has three at the moment). Follow him on Twitter.


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    Lucky us! Indie folk songstress Lucette has done the honor of recording a sweet acoustic version of her song “Bobby Reid” just for us.

    The song seems somehow familiar from the get go, an old-style lament sung with a sweet sadness.

    Soulful and rootsy, this song more than holds its own in this bare bones format.

    Lucette shares, "Here's a little video I made exclusively for Guitar World's Acoustic Nation, thanks GW! ‘Bobby Reid’ was the song that started it all for me. Until then, my songs were lacking the grit and substance that truly caught people's attention. The mystery behind the song embodies my essence as a writer, and I'm thankful for Dave Cobb because he brought that ability out of me."

    Check it out here:

    Indie folk songstress Lucette will capture your heart with her gentle voice, both beautiful and haunting.

    Releasing her debut album, Black Is the Color, just over four months ago, the collection was produced and recorded by the acclaimed Dave Cobb (Sturgill Simpson, Jason Isbell) and has reached over one million total plays on Spotify.

    In March 2015, Lucette will make her South by Southwest debut in Austin, TX with an official showcase and multiple appearances lined up. The year will also see her continue to tour throughout the States and Canada.

    Lucette commented on 2014’s accomplishments and the new year by noting, “2014 has been a huge year for me; releasing my album, the ‘Bobby Reid’ video, and touring with some of my friends and favorite musicians. Black Is the Color was an exploration into my love of southern mountain music, music that I've always loved, and it has been such a cool experience to see people react to it. I'm already excited about what 2015 has to bring, including SXSW!”

    2014 saw Lucette taking to the road and touring more than ever before. After her first tour ever of the States with the iconic Joe Ely, she went on to play shows with Mason Jennings, Nikki Lane, David Ramirez and Jim Lauderdale. She ended the year as direct support on Sturgill Simpson’s nearly sold-out fall tour.

    It is obvious to all those who listen that Lucette is an old and heavily romantic soul. Full of emotion, her performances take audiences back to the days when artists such as Neil Young, Emmylou Harris, and Loretta Lynn dominated the airwaves.

    To purchase Black Is the Color on iTunes, here: http://bit.ly/1598SKh.

    For more information, please visit: LucetteMusic.com.


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    Singer-songwriter Trevor Hall has announced the release of a new EP Unpack Your Memories, due out on Vanguard Records on March 27th.

    This five song collection includes some of Hall’s most personal tracks recorded solely by him, on his laptop.

    Hall talks about the history of these songs and why he chose to share them with the world at this time. “Unpack Your Memories is a collection of songs that have been in my “vault” for a long time now,” Hall says.

    “Some just didn’t make the other albums and some were just too intimate to share at the time. Now they are ready to breathe and be shared with others. The name of the album says everything … These are all songs that have become memories for me. I am reaching into my bag and unpacking them - unpacking their meaning, the memory of where I was when I wrote them, and the feelings that they brought me so many years ago. As the saying goes, ‘You never meet the same river twice.’ Every time I hear these songs, they teach me something new or offer me the gift of a new perspective. There are many other songs that are still in my vault, but I felt these were the most important to share at this time. The songs all came up together like the roots of a tree, and have taken form in the EP.”

    Check out the title track “Unpack Your Memories.”

    The Unpack Your Memories EP is available for pre-order from the Vanguard Records store here.

    Following the release of Unpack Your Memories, Trevor will be back on the road in Australia for his Bluesfest debut and in the U.S. Performances include the Soulshine Festival, California Roots Festival, Wanderlust and more. See a full list of tour dates below.

    Additional information on purchasing tickets can be found here.

    2015 Tour Dates

    APR 2 Melbourne, VIC, AUS SOULSHINE Fest -Festival Hall
    APR 5 Sydney, NSW, AUS SOULSHINE Fest - Enmore Theatre
    APR 6 Byron Bay, NSW, AUS Bluesfest
    APR 9 Maroochydore, QLD, AUS Sol Bar
    APR 10 Brisbane, QLD, AUS Tivoli (with Michael Franti)
    APR 11 Cairns, QLD, AUS Tivoli (with Michael Franti)
    APR 12 Cairns, QLD, AUS Tivoli (with Michael Franti)
    MAY 19 Humboldt, CA, USA Hum Brews
    MAY 20 Mill Valley, CA, USA Sweetwater
    MAY 22 Monterey, California, USA California Roots Fest
    MAY 23 Hermosa Beach, CA, USA Saint Rocke
    MAY 24 San Diego, CA, USA Belly Up
    JUN 16 Wilmington, DE, USA World Cafe Live Delaware
    JUN 17 Brooklyn, NY, USA Music Hall of Williamsburg
    JUN 18 Portland, ME, USA Port City Music Hall
    JUN 20 Stratton, VT, USA Wanderlust Festival
    JUN 21 Stratton VT, USA Wanderlust Festival (extra activities)
    JUN 26 Rothbury, MI, USA Electric Forest Festival
    JUN 27 Chicago, IL, USA Lincoln
    JUL 18 Lake Tahoe, CA, USA Wanderlust Festival
    JUL 19 Lake Tahoe, CA, USA Wanderlust Festival (extra activities)


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    This spring ON AN ON will embark upon tour dates with Big Data following multiple performances at SXSW.

    The Minneapolis trio have a big year ahead of them in 2015 as they prepare for the forthcoming release of their sophomore album later this summer.

    The follow up to their critically acclaimed debut Give In, the new album was recorded at the famous Sunset Sound in Los Angeles with legendary producer Joe Chiccarelli (Spoon, White Stripes, The Shins, My Morning Jacket).

    The first preview into ON AN ON's second coming is the hauntingly suspenseful "Drifting". Album release date and other details TBA in the coming months.

    Check it out this hauntingly beautiful song now:

    "'Drifting' is inspired by falling asleep behind the wheel and trying to forget unforgettable things. We've never had a song that sounded this naked." - ON AN ON

    When ON AN ON went into the studio in 2012 to make their debut LP, Give In, it was only weeks after the creation of the band, and everything felt new and open. They didn't have any specific sonic goals. They only wanted to capture what it sounded like for ON AN ON to begin.

    Give In was met with critical acclaim and a groundswell of enthusiasm from music fans who streamed the up and coming band's songs hundreds of thousands of times on SoundCloud and drove their singles to the top of the Hype Machine Popular chart. In short time this lead to tour and festival offers as well as other opportunities the band could only have dreamed of a few months prior.

    After a year and a half playing shows and festivals like Governors Ball, Bonnaroo and Iceland Airwaves across the US and Europe, the band returned to Minneapolis to begin writing their sophomore album. Being on the road provided ON AN ON with time to examine how they wanted to expand and grow sonically, resulting in more collaborative writing and experimental live tracking. It was this approach that they brought with them when entering the studio with Chiccarelli.

    ON AN ON is comprised by Nate Eiesland, Alissa Ricci, and Ryne Estwing. Further details on their new album including title and release date to be announced in the coming months.

    More at www.itsonanon.com

    Upcoming Tour Dates:
    * = w/ Big Data

    MARCH
    18 - SXSW - The Parish @ 3:35 PM (Stage Hop Party) -214 E. 6th St.
    19 - SXSW - Palm Door @ 12:00 PM (UMG Experience) -401 Sabine St.
    20 - SXSW - Clive Bar @ 5:00 PM (Culture Collide/Tilly's Party) -609 Davis St.
    20 - SXSW - Blackheart @ 11:00 PM (Roll Call / Indie Shuffle Showcase) -86 Rainey St.
    21 - SXSW - Whole Foods Roof Plaza @ 11:35 AM (Quantum Collective) -525 N. Lamar Blvd.
    24 - New York, NY - Bowery Ballroom *
    25 - Cambridge, MA - The Sinclair *
    26 - Philadelphia, PA - Underground Arts *
    27 - Washington, DC - Black Cat *
    30 - Chicago, IL - Lincoln Hall *

    APRIL
    01 - Milwaukee, WI - Fine Line Music Cafe *
    02 - Detroit, MI - The Shelter *
    03 - Cleveland, OH - Grog Shop *
    04 - Pittsburgh, PA - Stage AE *
    06 - Rochester, NY - Main Street Armory *
    07 - Buffalo, NY - Showplace Buffalo *
    11 - Ames, IA - The Maintenance Shop


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    A little surf rock, anyone?

    Canadian Chris Hau loves wake surfing—a sport that involves surfing the wake of a boat. He’s also a dedicated shredder, a lefty with a thing for Telecasters.

    So, naturally, he decided to combine the two passions by shredding on his Tele while riding a wakeboard. We also should note that he's sort of recreating a vintage Fender ad from the early Sixties; it shows a surfer playing a Fender while riding some bitchin' waves.

    As the video below shows, Hau makes it look easy, though it is certainly anything but. “There’s so many parts of your brain trying to work at the same time,” he says.

    Next time, might we suggest he use a Strat and play “Misirlou.” We bet even Slacktone's Dave Wronski or Dick Dale—the King of the Surf Guitar—would be impressed.


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    When Fathom Events, Cinema 1 and Eagle Rock Entertainment decided to partner up to present a monthly classic music series, they figured what better way to kick things off than by bringing in one of the most beloved rock bands of all time: Aerosmith.

    Taken from the band’s headlining appearance at last year’s Download Fest at Donington Park in Leicestershire, England, Aerosmith Rocks Donington is a one-night-only concert event that will screen on 300 theaters nationwide 7 p.m. today, Thursday, February 26.

    The Donington show once again finds the band at the top of their game. It features a 19-song set that features many of band’s iconic hits, including “Sweet Emotion,” “Walk This Way,” “Dream On,” “Love in a Elevator,” “Janie’s Got a Gun,” “Don’t Wanna Miss a Thing” and “Dude Looks Like a Lady.”

    Aerosmith is one of the biggest rock bands of all time. Together, Steven Tyler, Joe Perry, Tom Hamilton, Brad Whitford and Joey Kramer have sold more than 150 million albums worldwide in addition to receiving four Grammys and being inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

    In addition to releasing a DVD of the live show this spring, Aerosmith also has announced they will hit the road this summer.

    I spoke with bassist Tom Hamilton about Aerosmith Rocks Donington, music, gear and some of his most memorable moments.

    GUITAR WORLD: How did this live project begin?

    It’s something that’s been building for a long time. This isn’t the first time we’ve filmed a show and presented it, but the ability to capture it and have it sound great and have the visuals for it be really strong has gotten better and better over the years.

    Our feelings about playing at Donington is what really inspired us. We’ve played there several times in the past. It’s a festival that’s been going on for years and is very historic. So we got together with Dick Carruthers, who’s one of the best rock filmmakers around, and said, “Ok, let’s see how good we can make it!”

    As a performer, do you feel a sense of added pressure knowing that this is live and there’s no going back?

    Of course. Knowing it’s live always makes your brain concentrate a little more on making it work. We knew going in that we were filming and that we had a great director and great cameras. But we always try to out do ourselves every night, whether we’re recording or not. For us, it was more of an opportunity to make something exciting!

    Aerosmith’s last studio album, Music From Another Dimension was released in 2012. Has the band given any thought to releasing more new music? Maybe something from the archives?

    We have so much in our archives that we could put out. It’s all just a matter of finding the time to sit down and watch it and then come up with something. As far as a new album, we’re not really talking about it at this point. For me as an individual, I would love to go back into the studio within the next year and do it again.

    You originally started out as a guitarist but then made the switch to bass. How did that happen?

    That happened when I was twelve and had only being playing guitar for a few years. I came from a very small town in New Hampshire and there was really only one band in town I thought was any good. I really wanted to join them but they told me they already had two guitar players. That’s when they said they needed someone to play bass and even had one that I could use. They wound up talking me into it and I found myself really enjoying being able to fulfill that role in the band. The bass guitar is the translator between the drums and the guitar and it’s an interesting instrument to play physically.

    What’s your live setup like these days?

    I’ve been using Gallien Krueger amplifiers for years. For bass, there’s a G&L that I use. It was Leo Fender’s third guitar company. Their instruments are just fantastic!

    Can you tell me how you came up with the music for “Sweet Emotion”?

    I think it was during one of those days where I probably partook in some “flammable materials” [laughs]. In that mode of consciousness where inspiration seems to come in great big chunks is where I came up with that intro bass part. It really was just a daydream.

    I do remember that around the same time that I wrote it the band was listening to a lot of Jeff Beck’s album, Rough and Ready. That album had a lot of very funky, energetic bass playing on it and it inspired me for those sessions in between verses. Then Steven came up with a vocal for it that was just perfect. When I heard it all in one piece for the first time I knew something good was going to happen from it.

    Joe Perry and Steven Tyler have written autobiographies about the band. Have you ever given thought to writing a book about your own life and career?

    I’ve been thinking about it more and more because people keep asking me. I do have a lot to say, but it’s just a matter of having the discipline to sit down every morning and just write and write so I can get the story out. Its something that I think I’ll probably wind up doing at some point by popular demand.

    Of all the band’s highlights over the years, is there one that stands out to you as most memorable?

    That’s a tough question because there have been so many special moments. But I’d have to say having the chance to play in places like Russia, India, Dubai and Argentina.

    The idea that we have fans in places like that is a fantastic thought. I remember years ago when Russia was still communist and our music was basically against the law. I would hear through the grapevine that we had a lot of fans there that wanted to see us. Then when the system changed and we could go there we were able to close the loop, finish the thought and play our songs live there. Playing some of the places we weren’t sure we would ever be able to is something that’s very inspiring to me.

    For more information, visit aerosmith.com.

    James Wood is a writer, musician and self-proclaimed metalhead who maintains his own website, GoJimmyGo.net. His articles and interviews are written on a variety of topics with passion and humor. You can follow him on Twitter @JimEWood.

    Additional Content

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    Electricity can do strange things.

    When it was added to the guitar, some years ago, it opened up new possibilities for players of the old box o’ six strings.

    The following sonic scientists, using varying proportions of technique and effects, set out to discover just what these possibilities were.

    The result? Guitars that don’t sound like guitars!

    10. Jeff Beck and Jimmy Page, “Happenings Ten Years Time Ago”

    This is a rare occasion—Jimmy Page and Jeff Beck playing guitar together in the Yardbirds.

    Before the solo kicks in, the two guitar heroes, in tandem, unleash 15 seconds of controlled feedback that sounds like an air-raid siren. Think context: this was the 1960s, before everyone started using signal processing.




    09. Johnny Marr “How Soon is Now?”

    What is that pulsing sound in the Smiths' coolest song? Marr cranking the tremolo setting on his Fender Twin to make his one-chord riff sound like an automated machine.

    Actually, the effect was studio enhanced: he re-recorded the part with five twins.




    08. Eddie Van Halen, “Eruption”

    Again, it’s the context, mang. In 1978, Eddie’s fingerboard tapping and whammy-bar divebombs were like the shape of video-game soundtracks for years to come.

    Then, of course, every guitarist in L.A. jumped on the bandwagon, and before long things got much more sophisticated than Space Invaders.




    07. Paul Gilbert, “Solo” from Live Extreme, Vol. 1

    Some players use effects as tools. Paul Gilbert uses tools as effects.

    One pick wasn’t enough to get the tremelo-picking sound he wanted. The solution? A cordless drill, on whose bit were mounted three picks. This produces overtones that make it sound as if he’s playing in unison with himself, if that makes sense.




    06. Tom Morello, “Revolver”

    The intro sounds like R2D2 on a bad trip, while the start of the solo calls to mind a factory treadmill.

    It just goes to show that if you give a man a DigiTech Whammy pedal, an Ibanez Talman with a sturdy toggle switch and few Allen wrenches, he can make all the same noises as a turntablist—and then some.




    05. Buckethead, “Dead Man Walking”

    From Praxis Transmutation, this is the next level of video-game soundtracks played by electric guitar. The masked man’s hyper-frenetic tapping here out-blips a computer in heat.




    04. Jimi Hendrix, “The Star Spangled Banner”

    Jimi performed this at the height of the Vietnam War, and his revolutionary use of feedback and tremolo bar was the perfect musical correlative to “bombs bursting in air.”

    When you first listened to this, did your mom come into the room and ask if the stereo was broken?




    03. Steve Vai, “Next Stop Earth”

    From his solo-debut, Flex-Able, this gem finds Vai imitating the inflections of a human voice via finger slides, micro-bends and a wah pedal. Can you tell he used to play with Zappa?




    02. Fred Frith, “Should Old Arthur”

    On his 1974 album, Guitar Solos, this former member of obscure prog-rockers Henry Cow pioneered the concept of “preparing” guitars: tuning them to unorthodox pitches, attaching alligator clips to the strings, and playing them by any means other than picking.

    This particular track sounds like a drunken ghost talking.




    01. Adrian Belew, “Elephant Talk”

    When Belew joined Robert Fripp’s reformed King Crimson for 1981’s Discipline, he stunned guitarists by harnessing the effects in his rack to sound like a herd of animals.

    In this case, an Electro-Harmonix Big Muff running into a Deluxe Electric Mistress flanger helps transform a guitar into a roaring elephant.

    Additional Content

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    These videos and audio files are bonus content related to the April 2015 issue of Guitar World. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now or at the Guitar World Online Store.


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    These videos and audio files are bonus content related to the April 2015 issue of Guitar World. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now or at the Guitar World Online Store.


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    These videos and audio files are bonus content related to the April 2015 issue of Guitar World. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now or at the Guitar World Online Store.

    When you see me holding an acoustic guitar, I know what you’re thinking...Satchel! Have you gone country?

    Hey, if I just played music to become rich, then yes, I’d go country. But I'm a metal guitar player, and I play the guitar because I love metal! A lot of great metal music features the acoustic guitar all over the place. Go ask Jimmy Page!

    Our unbelievably good album, Balls Out, features the song “If You Really, Really Love Me,” for which I performed the rhythm guitar tracks on acoustic and played the solo on electric.

    FIGURE 1 shows the verse rhythm part: for every chord in this progression, I include the open top two strings, which fills out the sound of the chords while also widening them harmonically. For example, the first chord is constructed from a fretted B5 power chord shape on the A, D and G strings but also includes the open B and high E strings.

    The B string doubles the root note while the high E string adds the fourth, resulting in a Bsus4 chord, or B5add4. For the second chord, I lift my ring finger off the D string and move my index finger from the A string over to the D string’s second fret, while keeping the top three strings the same as the previous chord, with the pinkie still planted on the G string’s fourth fret.

    For the rest of this column, including the tabs, check out the April 2015 issue of Guitar World.


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    These videos and audio files are bonus content related to the April 2015 issue of Guitar World. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now or at the Guitar World Online Store.


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    These videos and audio files are bonus content related to the April 2015 issue of Guitar World. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now or at the Guitar World Online Store.


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    These videos and audio files are bonus content related to the April 2015 issue of Guitar World. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now or at the Guitar World Online Store.


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    It's time once again for Guitar World's annual 40 Percent Off Clearance Sale!

    Take 40 perfect off everything in our Online Store!

    This sale runs through February 28, 2015.

    Just be sure to enter code FEB40215 at checkout.

    Once again, that's FEB40215.

    Head to the Guitar World Online Store now!


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    For longtime Ibanez fan Joe Satriani, sketching and drawing have always been as much of a creative outlet as his game-changing, guitar-driven rock music.

    These two different hemispheres of his artistry converge beautifully in Ibanez’s new, limited 25th anniversary edition of Joe’s iconic signature JS guitar, the JS25ART. The body of each guitar bears a full color illustration, hand drawn by Satriani himself.

    Each one is different and there are only 50 of them, 25 of which are slated for sale in the U.S. Offering a unique opportunity to be a guitar collector and art collector all in one, this very special JS edition commemorates the birth of Satriani’s Ibanez signature model 25 years ago.

    “Ibanez approached me and asked if I’d do something special for the 25th anniversary,” Satriani recalls.

    “They didn’t know what I was going to do, but I decided to illustrate some guitars myself. The idea took a lot of setup, because I had to figure out, ‘Am I going to paint them or use pens? What would the process be? Could I erase?’ So I wound up using these color pens. I spent about a week down in L.A. late in 2014 doing the illustrations and it was a lot of fun. But it was intense. With the pens, you can’t really put color on color. Nor can you erase. Some of the ones I did are more detailed; others are just line drawings. They’re all signed.”

    Technically speaking, the JS25ART embodies all the design refinements distilled over Satriani’s quarter century of collaboration with Ibanez. This includes a maple, JS Prestige neck with hand-rolled fret edges, Satriani’s signature DiMarzio pickups (the Satch Track and Mo’ Joe), a hi-pass filter on the volume pot, a coil tap on the tone pot and a low-profile Edge tremolo bridge.

    Longtime fans of Satriani’s visual art many recognize some of the bizarre faces and characters depicted on some of the guitars. Many of these characters are soon to come to life in an animated sci-series, tentatively titled Crystal Planet, that Satch is working on with fretless guitarist and digital animator Ned Evett.

    Below, be sure to check out our comprehensive photo gallery of all of Ibanez's current signature Satch guitars, including electrics and acoustics!

    For more about Satch's signature Ibanez electric guitars, head here. For more about his acoustic models, head here. For more about Ibanez Guitars, visit ibanez.co.jp.

    Additional Content

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    Here AN editor Laura B. Whitmore sits down with New York City-based songwriter, Emilyn Brodsky.

    A ukulele player who writes “simple songs about complicated feelings,” Brodsky’s latest LP, Emilyn Brodsky Eats Her Feelings, is out now.

    Below she describes the meaning behind the album, its recording process, her experience of performing on HBO’s Girls and much more.

    Stay tuned for more from Brodsky, including performances live from our studio. In the mean time, visit www.emilynbrodsky.net for more.


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    Teaser Content: 

    This month we’re sharing something really fun. It’s a kickin’ contest that brings you both an instrument and some musical inspiration. We’re giving away this wonderful, brand new D’Angelico acoustic guitar, the Lexington SD300 in Cherry Sunburst. Plus some killer music by award-winning artist Will Dailey performed on a D’Angelico acoustic as well!!

    This month we’re sharing something really fun.

    It’s a kickin’ contest that brings you both an instrument and some musical inspiration.

    We’re giving away this wonderful, brand new D’Angelico acoustic guitar, the Lexington SD300 in Cherry Sunburst. Plus some killer music by award-winning artist Will Dailey performed on a D’Angelico acoustic as well!!

    About the D’Angelico Lexington SD300

    In the early 1900s, the word ‘dreadnought’ referred to a massive battleship. Well, here’s D’Angelico’s interpretation!

    A booming non-cutaway dreadnought, the Lexington (SD-300) offers a powerful low-end so resonant that playing lush, full chords may very well become addictive.

    A solid Sitka spruce top meets a sapele back and sides to create the Lexington’s subtle elegance, complemented by a tortoise pickguard. The slim, mahogany neck makes for wonderful playability. Though capable of great projection, the Lexington’s high-end is uncompromised by its rich low-end, producing a consistently balanced sound and making it an excellent choice for a great variety of players. More at dangelicoguitars.com

    It’s valued at $899!

    DAASD300CSB_2 copy 72 horizontal.jpg

    Bonus: Will Dailey’s National Throat

    And here to show you one of D’Angelico’s gorgeous new acoustics in action is Boston-based artist Will Dailey. Dailey’s latest release, National Throat, debuted in the top 20 in the Billboard Heatseekers chart, is winner of a Boston Music Award for Album of the Year and Dailey himself was awarded this year’s Artist of the Year.

    national throat.jpgIn preparation for a special bonus release of a deluxe version of that excellent album, Dailey recorded several songs using a hot-off-the-presses D’Angelico acoustic.

    The Deluxe version due out March 24th will include all the songs from National Throat and 6 bonus tracks, “Stand Where I Can See You” (Live), “Why Do I” (Live), the full studio of “Sunken Ship,” a demo of “Higher Education,” “$300 Dollar Man,” (written in a reaction to being a part of Farm Aid), and a cover of Arcade Fire’s “Sprawl II (Mountains Beyond Mountains)."

    We’ll be giving away a few copies of National Throat on CD and Vinyl as well digital downloads of the Deluxe version in addition to this fabulous guitar! More at www.willdailey.com

    Enter now!!

    Fill out my online form.
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    This month we’re sharing something really fun.

    It’s a kickin’ contest that brings you both an instrument and some musical inspiration.

    We’re giving away this wonderful, brand new D’Angelico acoustic guitar, the Lexington SD300 in Cherry Sunburst. Plus some killer music by award-winning artist Will Dailey performed on a D’Angelico acoustic as well!!

    About the D’Angelico Lexington SD300

    In the early 1900s, the word ‘dreadnought’ referred to a massive battleship. Well, here’s D’Angelico’s interpretation!

    A booming non-cutaway dreadnought, the Lexington (SD-300) offers a powerful low-end so resonant that playing lush, full chords may very well become addictive.

    A solid Sitka spruce top meets a sapele back and sides to create the Lexington’s subtle elegance, complemented by a tortoise pickguard. The slim, mahogany neck makes for wonderful playability. Though capable of great projection, the Lexington’s high-end is uncompromised by its rich low-end, producing a consistently balanced sound and making it an excellent choice for a great variety of players. More at dangelicoguitars.com

    It’s valued at $899! Enter now to win>>

    DAASD300CSB_2 copy 72 horizontal.jpg

    Bonus: Will Dailey’s National Throat

    And here to show you one of D’Angelico’s gorgeous new acoustics in action is Boston-based artist Will Dailey. Dailey’s latest release, National Throat, debuted in the top 20 in the Billboard Heatseekers chart, is winner of a Boston Music Award for Album of the Year and Dailey himself was awarded this year’s Artist of the Year.

    national throat.jpgIn preparation for a special bonus release of a deluxe version of that excellent album, Dailey recorded several songs using a hot-off-the-presses D’Angelico acoustic.

    The Deluxe version due out March 24th will include all the songs from National Throat and 6 bonus tracks, “Stand Where I Can See You” (Live), “Why Do I” (Live), the full studio of “Sunken Ship,” a demo of “Higher Education,” “$300 Dollar Man,” (written in a reaction to being a part of Farm Aid), and a cover of Arcade Fire’s “Sprawl II (Mountains Beyond Mountains)."

    We’ll be giving away a few copies of National Throat on CD and Vinyl as well digital downloads of the Deluxe version in addition to this fabulous guitar! More at www.willdailey.com

    Enter now!!


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    EarthQuaker Devices' Sea Machine is a chorus pedal with ultimate control over parameters rarely seen in a chorus.

    A hybrid of digital and analog circuitry with a slightly extended delay time allows it to really stand out and shimmer. The heart of the Sea Machine is a short digital delay line, which features controls for Animation, Dimension and Depth.

    The Animation allows control over the delay time, Dimension adjusts the amount of spatial regeneration and the Depth adjust the mix of the modulated wet signal against the dry analog signal. The LFO section of the Sea Machine is comprised of Rate, Intensity and Shape. The Rate adjusts the speed of the oscillator, the Intensity adjusts how much the LFO modulates the delayed signal and the Shape transforms the wave from a soft triangle to a hard square wave.

    We also included a small LED, which shows the speed and shape of the LFO, even in bypass. With this mix of standard and unique controls, everything from subtle warble, classic Leslie, seasick pitch bends to strangled alien sounds, stunted arpeggiations and many more far out sounds are on tap.

    The Sea Machine also was designed to work well following fuzz, distortion or overdrive without getting muddy, reducing volume or breaking up. When engaged, the transparent buffer leaves the all-analog dry signal unaltered and crystal clear. The Sea Machine is true bypass and made by human hands with the highest-quality parts in Akron, Ohio.

    Controls

    Rate: Sets the speed of the LFO. The miniature LED will show the tempo even in bypass mode.
    Shape: From soft triangle through hard square wave.
    Dimension: Adds a slight slap-back at low levels, reverb-like ambiance at mid levels and an echo-resonance at max.
    Intensity: How much the LFO modulates the delay time.
    Animate: How far the pitch shifted signal swings, lower levels equals a tighter and more focused shift à la traditional chorus. As you increase the control a more wild and animated pitch shift begins to emerge.
    Depth: How much modulated signal is blended in with the dry signal.

    For more information, visit earthquakerdevices.com and follow EarthQuaker Devices on Facebook.


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